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Great Pumpkin

The Great Pumpkin is rising!

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Lee Salem 1946-2019

The first famous person I ever saw at ComicCon was Lee Salem. It was my first year attending that convention, before I even had a table. One of my early stops was to the Universal Press Syndicate booth. To my complete shock I saw the man himself, talking with a few other editors. I approached him with the awe appropriate to kings and religious figures, and I think he was baffled by this young man’s recognition. I shook his hand, mumbled something about how great it was to meet him, then moved on. That moment stands as one of my all-time ComicCon highlights (and I’ve met the voice of SpongeBob).

As longtime readers of this here blog know, I wanted to be a newspaper cartoonist since I was a kid. Calvin and Hobbes has been my guiding light since around age 10. Through that strip, I’ve learned just about everything I know about making good comics. Of course there have been others, but Watterson’s work has become so ingrained I believe you can see some of the jokes written in my DNA.

At some point I learned that Lee Salem was Bill Watterson’s editor. I later learned he edited many of the greatest comics to ever grace the pages of newspapers. This was a man I needed to know. As any good writer knows, they are only as good as their editor (Salem’s suggestion on an early submission from Watterson, to focus on the younger brother of the main character, led to the creation of Calvin and Hobbes). When I was old enough to submit comics to syndicates, my first letter was always addressed to Mr. Lee Salem.

Though I never got to work with him (he was promoted to President of Universal Press Syndicate before his retirement) his legacy left a lasting impression on me.

Bill Watterson’s retirement gift to Lee Salem

It feels strange to miss a man whose work was, for the most part, invisible. He helped innumerable cartoonists be funnier. He led the industry to give creators more rights. He was president of a comics syndicate during a time of great uncertainty and change. He did all these things well. I am sorry to hear that he is no longer with us. I am grateful for the good work he did.

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San Diego ComicCon 2019

My eighth year at San Diego ComicCon was just as fun and surprising as ever. Falling Rock National Park issue 8 made its debut. Dinosaurs in Space continues to be my biggest seller. I got to catch up with old friends, and I made some new contacts. In all, a very successful trip. Here’s a few highlights, but if you want even more, visit my Instagram @kidshaycomics.

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Cul de Sac, part 4 of 6

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one thought podcast

I had the great honor of being interviewed by David Gardner of One Thought Podcast. We talked about my practice, influences, and a whole range of digressions. It was a lot of fun, and I think I don’t come off sounding completely incoherent. Have a listen! David is a great host.

Listen here.

(Or find it wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.)

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issue 7 IS HERE

At long last, the follow up to issue 6 has arrived.
This issue is a single, 24 page story featuring Ernesto the lizard in a Hitchcockian thriller.
With jokes!
Order your copy here.


I will be at one convention this year, San Diego ComicCon in July,
and you can also get your signed copy directly from me there.

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issue 7 is almost here

Issue 7 is complete and ready to go to the printer! I will have more updates, including ordering information, very soon. In the meantime, here is the cover art for the issue. I’m incredibly excited to share this story with you all.

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issue 7 progress

Fear not, dear reader, Falling Rock National Park has not gone away. I’ve been chipping away at issue 7 for the past year. It certainly is the longest time between issues, and for that I apologize. Family, and life, sometimes necessitate a break from comics. This is a good thing.

I wanted to share a bit of the process for this issue, since it is already quite different from all previous issues. So far I’ve been penciling pages digitally, on my iPad. This is what they look like right now:


When I finish a page I print it out on 11×17 paper. Currently I’m thinking that I will still ink issue 7 on paper with a brush, as I have done in the past. Issue 7 is, like #6, one single story. It will run 24 pages and it will contain jokes. That’s all I will say for now.

Thanks for sticking around! I wish you happy holidays, and stay tuned for more updates in 2018. Onward!

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Scenes from a ComicCon

A short video I made about this year’s San Diego ComicCon.

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Richard Thompson 1957-2016

As a grown-up type person, I never expected to fall in love with a comic strip as deeply as I did when I was 8. Cul de Sac took me back to that 8 year-old self, but it also propelled me forward to the future, where I wanted desperately to make comics as moving and flat-out funny as Richard Thompson’s.

 

Cul de Sac made its debut in newspapers in 2007. I was a fan immediately. Mere descriptions will not do this comic justice. Please do yourself a favor and, if you haven’t already, click over and read some of the brilliant work Richard did. At a time when everybody thought of newspaper comics as moribund, Richard created one of the greatest strips of all time. That is not hyperbole, that is fact. Had Parkinson’s not made it impossible for Richard to continue Cul de Sac, he could have easily told stories about the Otterloop family for decades. Cul de Sac ended in 2012. Four years later, Richard has left us as well.

On the last day of Cul de Sac, I drew a meeting between Richard's Ernesto and my own.
On the last day of Cul de Sac, I drew a meeting between Richard’s Ernesto and my own.

Compounding my feelings of loss, the man himself was as kind and generous as any of us could ever hope to be. When I emailed him soon after Cul de Sac was announced, he shot back a complimentary email in no time. Despite the fact that he had a full-time illustration career, a newly-launched DAILY comic strip, and, you know, family and friends, he took time to encourage a twenty-something cartoonist whom he had never once met. I cannot overestimate what that meant to me, and still means to me now. Cartooning can be a lonely endeavor, but with people like Richard out there it sure feels like a community.

 

From Richard’s first email to me: “I enjoyed your comic; today’s with the quick view of the statue holding its own head cracked me up, and I’m a sucker for a Beethoven gag. And the owl’s Fossilarium made me laugh up.  I’m lousy with advice right now, I haven’t figured it out yet myself. A friend of mine just started teaching a law class and he told me he’s keeping one chapter ahead of the students and I feel pretty much like him, except he probably uses more phrases in Latin.”

 

And later, he sent some kind words about the Falling Rock books I sent him: “I just read through them while I should’ve been sketching (distractions help) and I just really enjoyed the hell out of them. I think you must enjoy writing for Carver the most. If I didn’t know I was dealing with someone from a law firm I’d steal some ideas from you, like the Passing Fancy. I’d forgotten how much I like that phrase.”

 

Richard had a fondness for language that suited him perfectly to the constraints of a comic strip, where every word counts.

 

In 2009 I was fortunate enough to see Richard speak as an honored guest of San Diego ComicCon. His panel was hugely entertaining and enlightening. Afterwards, I snuck backstage and got to talk with him for a few minutes. He was as gracious in person as he was as a pen pal. It felt like I was talking to a guru. Benevolent, modest, and of course incredibly funny.

richard-thompson-signature

Of the many compliments I could pay to Richard’s work, I think the most important aspect was his fearless creativity. Very few artists can make the act of creation look so gosh darn fun. It was like he found new toys daily and couldn’t wait to share them with us all. I could try to imitate Richard’s chaotic/controlled linework, I could try to write characters and stories with the same whimsy, but the real legacy Richard left us was his artistic expedition. The goal of comic strips is to make us laugh, but Richard wasn’t content with that (although I’m sure he’d take it). Richard made the suburbs a surreal place, he took the anger and vitriol out of editorial cartooning, and he raised caricature to high art. I’ll miss Richard’s work, I’ll miss our sporadic correspondence, but I will try my best to remember the artistic path he was leading us on.
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